Tag Archive for laudato si’

Setting Our Sights on the Amazon

The following is a network case from the Jesuits in Latin America and the Caribbean for the Amazon through the Pan-Amazonian Ecclesial Network (REPAM). It is a letter from the Colombian Provincial Carlos E. Correa, S.J and it is entitled “Setting our sights on the Amazon.”

Bishops of El Salvador warn against privatizing water

El Salvador’s bishops urged lawmakers to discard any plans for privatizing water in the Central American country, saying the poor could not afford to pay the cost of a vital necessity. In a terse statement, issued June 12 and titled, “We will not allow the poor to die of thirst,” the Salvadoran bishops’ conference cited Pope Francis’ encyclical “Laudato Si’, on Care for Our Common Home,” which said, “Access to potable and secure water is a basic, fundamental and universal human right because it determines the survival of people and therefore is a condition for the exercising of all other rights.”

Jesuit Institute facilitates ‘Care of the Common Home’ workshop

People from all over the Archdiocese of Cape Town gathered in the hall of St Anthony’s Catholic Church in Langa for a workshop on Laudato Si’ – Pope Francis’ encyclical on the environment.  Fittingly, for drought stricken Cape Town, the day of the workshop was cold and wet.

 

Pope reiterates concern for migrants, refugees, environment

Pope Francis sent a message to a June 5-8 international symposium entitled, “Toward a Greener Attica: Preserving the Planet and Protecting its People,” in Athens, Greece, sponsored by the Ecumenical Patriarchate of Constantinople. The waters of the Mediterranean Sea have “become a tomb for men, women and children” is how Pope Francis lamented the fate of migrants and refugees in a message to an international ecological symposium that kicked off on Tuesday in the Greek capital, Athens.

Praying with Creation and forming communities of practice and justice

Environment is relationship, it is community, it is family.  Saint Francis knew this.  The land gives us life, gives us food, filters our water and gives us a home.

Just because we make cement, steel girders, motors, microchips, and robots with our intelligence and extract all things from the land, our work and our production should not extract us from the book of nature.  Robots may replace many human functions, but the value of personal reflection and community action, our sense of the meaning of life, is what it is to be human.  When we value human reflection and compassion and hope deeply, the human is never irrelevant.

New Program: Certificate in Integral Ecology

Challenged by the growing ecological crisis and impelled by Pope Francis’ call for ecological conversion, Loyola School of Theology is now offering a Certificate Program in Integral Ecology. This program addresses the urgent environmental issues and explores alternative perspectives and lines of action. Following the insights of Pope Francis’ Encyclical Laudato Si’, this program uses the lenses of Biblical Theology, Systematic Theology, Moral Theology and Interreligious Spirituality to reflect on the political, cultural, economic and scientific aspects of the damage we have inflicted on our common home.