Archive for Agriculture

Experimental farm professor “Andrés Vloeberg”

Our experimental farm “Andrés Vloeberg” is located in the Madre Vieja Sur sector at 3.4 kilometers, approximately 10 minutes from the physical plant of the Instituto Politécnico Loyola (IPL). The production of the same one is divided in: cunicultura, porcicultura, ovine upbringing and pecuaria; On the other hand there is the area of ​​nurseries of ornamental fruit trees and nurseries. It has areas of greenhouses and open field, the latter houses temporary tropical crops. All this with the objective that the students of Agronomy of the Technical Baccalaureate and those of Agro-enterprise Engineering of the Specialized Institute of Higher Studies Loyola (IEESL), develop their practices.

Silveira House Empowering mine affected communities

Today the centre continues to provide a safe-space for deep reflection and formation in a post-liberation Zimbabwe, which faces new issues and challenges. One major challenge is injustices associated with the mining sector. Silveira House director Fr Gibson Munyoro SJ together with members of the advocacy and peace-building team explained how they are working with communities who are affected by mines.

Since 2013 they have been especially involved with two cases. The first is a community next to a black granite mine in Mutoko lying in the Mashonland East province, about 143km from Harare. The people close to the quarry have suffered greatly, including from the dumping of waste on their agricultural lands. The second is a community close to a coal mine in Hwange in the western province of Matabeleland North.

Zero hunger, food security, improved nutrition, and sustainable agriculture (SDG 2)

2017_01_15_Editorial_Photo1It is disconcerting that in the 21st century, hunger remains a second priority when talking about Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) – after eradication of extreme poverty, one of the main causes of hunger.

The hunger problem, it would seem, should have been almost overcome, or is experienced only in pockets in certain areas of the world today.  According to the UN World Food Programme however, “some 795 million people in the world do not have enough food to lead a healthy active life.  That’s about one in nine people on earth”, even as notable advancements are achieved in food issues.

CERED: Contributing to research for sustainable development in DR Congo

2016_09_30_pp_photo1CERED is part of the Institut Supérieur Agro-Vétérinaire Saint Pierre Canisius (ISAV) and now called Faculté des sciences Agronomiques et vétérinaires (FSAV), a Jesuit institution dedicated to research in agriculture, veterinary, and sustainable development, where sustainability involves anthropological, social and economic factors.  The program is multidisciplinary and participatory, involving diverse stakeholders that include researchers, students, research technicians, as well as local communities.  Research in CERED covers both theoretical and practical aspects and topics of natural sciences and the social sciences, and puts the welfare of people at the core of the research concerns.

Botanical garden Gaspar Xuárez sj

The mission of this botanical garden is to establish itself as a national center for conservation, will research, education and sustainable use of biodiversity in the central region of Argentina. An educational program is developed with primary and secondary schools in the region through guided tours and workshops to the community. The goal is to raise awareness of the value of natural resources and public understanding of the issue of biodiversity, its importance and its loss.

Planting the Seeds of Sustainability in Brazil

APaintingTires1078a-702x336 group of Fordham’s Global Outreach (GO!) students teamed up with a local community from a rural province in Brazil to learn about deforestation and promote food sustainability.

The trip was part of GO’s program in the small Brazilian town of Colinas do Tocantins. In late May and early June, eight Fordham students and chaperone Ann Marie Boccuzzi, assistant director for alumni relations, worked with locals to start a community garden near the Sao Sebatiao Church where they stayed.

The trip gave Boccuzzi, GABELLI ’10, a former GO! executive board member, a chance to apply her Jesuit education to “help students immerse themselves in a new culture while also facing challenging social justice issues.”