Archive for Organic farm and Eco Agri

The Pursuit of Purity: Organic Foods and Souls

ibo_et_non_redibo_pursuit_of_purityA somewhat recent phenomenon that has surfaced in the society is the pursuit of purity when it comes to food. It can be seen most clearly in the preference towards organic food and non-genetically modified organisms (GMO), a movement which has been gaining momentum. This is especially apparent when it is viewed within the context of the state of the food industry today: on the whole, more and more chemicals and GMOs are being used in farming to produce the highest yield possible, thus maximizing the profits.

Catholic workers’ co-op installing sustainable mini-farms on Peninsula and beyond

201505125050The grounds of St. Patrick’s Seminary & University boast row upon row of broccoli, Swiss chard, kale and strawberries this spring, products of a new parish Catholic workers cooperative created in a venture among the seminary, Guadalupe Associates and the parish of St. Francis of Assisi, East Palo Alto.

“I was actually surprised we yielded so much the first year,” said Sulpician Father Gladstone Stevens, rector of the seminary who along with San Francisco Archbishop Salvatore J. Cordileone approved the use of seminary grounds to grow the crops as part of NanoFarms USA’s pilot project. The website is nanofarms.com.

Where a Farmer must know his Land

waterbreakatKasisiFor some years I had been thinking out loud about engaging in volunteer work. Each time I expressed these thoughts my wife would reply, “Yes, wait until you retire”. I worked as Career Guidance Counsellor in St.Finian’s College, Mullingar, Ireland. Five years previously I had completed a training course with Viatores Christi in overseas volunteer work.

Retirement came in June 2014, after my 65th birthday. That week an email arrived asking if I was interested in going to Zambia to assist the Jesuits there setting up a commercial dairy farm enterprise; I had also retired from running my own 55 cow dairy farm about eight years ago. Since God had blessed me with a healthy family and good health, my wife and I decided it was a great opportunity to give a little assistance back to people who are less well off.

Urban Farming Club Plants Spring Garden

Seniors Andrew Russo and Kutauba AbuMousa planting for the early summer harvest.

On a recent Saturday morning, the Urban Farming Club cleaned, tilled, fertilized, and planted their spring garden. With thanks to Southern Gateway Garden Center, the club looks forward to harvesting a variety of tomatoes, cucumbers, basil, parsley, rosemary, celery, and red, yellow and green peppers. The garden is all organic, using flowers as insecticide. The crops will be donated a local non-profit organization this summer.

The Minor in Urban Agriculture

6206284693_a2ba2ba5b1_bUrban Agriculture students learn about corporate food systems, alternative and more equitable models of urban-based agriculture, and larger food and environmental justice movements. That’s when they aren’t getting their hands dirty in the University of San Francisco Community Garden and with organizations around the Bay Area, learning advanced skills in organic gardening, permaculture, urban homesteading, sustainable living and local food production and distribution.

The urban garden project: How gardening can help change the lives of young orphan girls

aa41-207x300Because of the increasing convenience of several food brands—fast food chains, instant meals, and frozen microwave dishes—the world is becoming more prone to food-related diseases. Health problems are popping up right and left due to people’s preferences for cheap and quick meals, even at the expense of ingesting chemicals that may be harmful to the body. What the world needs is healthier food, packaged with the same convenience as its chemically engineered counterpart.