Archive for b. Zero hunger

Formative and naturalistic initiative of the Jesuit fathers

Teaching to grow bananas to promote micro-entrepreneurship projects, but also to save bananas from extinction. This is the project launched in Douala by the Jesuits of Cameroon. An initiative that has a dual value, formative and naturalistic, in a difficult context which characterizes the African country. In Cameroon, over three million boys and girls did not reach the minimum level of school education. 70% of girls are illiterate

My visit to Villa Loyola, a coffee finca in Colombia

Consumers are gaining concern over the sources of our food.  Is it farmed sustainably?  Are dangerous chemicals used, or is it produced organically?  How are the producers (farmers) compensated for their labors? With these questions in mind, I was happy to discover a Jesuit-owned coffee farm called Villa Loyola or Finca Loyola that advocates sustainable agriculture in Chachagüí, in the the Nariño region of Colombia.  It is completely organic.  Villa Loyola is a large operation with all its staff and laborers, not to mention their specialization on bamboo-based carpentry.

Helping ex-prisoners in Thailand reintegrate into society

The Emmaus Center is situated on a two-acre lot in Mae Tang District, Chiang Mai, and is focussed on organic farming.  The main office building, Emmaus House, was completed two months ago, on May 29, and by next month, Kep hopes to have the house fully furnished and operational.  There are plans to engage in handicraft and carpentry work, especially making small furniture and utensils that can be used in the house and farm.  The team hopes to include carpentry in its skills training programme in the future.

Conversion in the light of Laudato Si’

Religious and lay people from six countries – Colombia, Argentina, Chile, Ghana, Brazil and Spain – have ended the fourth theoretical-practical Week of Ecological Conversion held in INEA, Valladolid. This proposal born in the environment of the INEA’s Organic Gardens and it is growing with the call of Pope Francis Laudato Si’. The encyclical continues appealing religious and lay people.

Putting Wasted Food to Good Use

“The food is cooked and has never been touched,” says Kacie LaGuire ’19 who was among a handful of socially conscious students who in 2014 noticed the amount of prepared food the kitchen throws out as surplus. “Yet we know that one in four San Franciscans face hunger — we all see it every day.” Soon after, the students established the USF chapter of the Food Recovery Network (FRN), a national nonprofit with the dual goals of feeding the hungry and reducing wasted food’s 3.3 billion ton carbon footprint — which, if it were a country, would make it the third largest CO2 emitter behind China and the U.S.

‘Holy Cross Summer Course Explores Realities of Food Production’

“Meal time will never be the same again!” That’s how Christopher Staysniak, visiting lecturer of history at the College of the Holy Cross, started the six-week summer course titled “Food and Power” back in June. According to Staysniak, a key goal of the course is to get students to think about where their food comes from, and who is providing it. Through readings, guest speakers, and field trips, the history class analyzed American food from different cultural, economic, environmental, and sociological angles.