Archive for a. Poverty

Putting Wasted Food to Good Use

“The food is cooked and has never been touched,” says Kacie LaGuire ’19 who was among a handful of socially conscious students who in 2014 noticed the amount of prepared food the kitchen throws out as surplus. “Yet we know that one in four San Franciscans face hunger — we all see it every day.” Soon after, the students established the USF chapter of the Food Recovery Network (FRN), a national nonprofit with the dual goals of feeding the hungry and reducing wasted food’s 3.3 billion ton carbon footprint — which, if it were a country, would make it the third largest CO2 emitter behind China and the U.S.

Collaboration with Jesuit-based higher learning institutions in Myanmar and Thailand

In recent years, two Jesuit schools have been established in Myanmar and Thailand to offer higher learning to minority students belonging to diverse ethnic, linguistic and religious groups. These schools are located in areas that are challenged by poverty, income disparity, inter-ethnic coexistence and lack of educational access, the key issues of sustainable development addressed by Jesuit education.

Social Justice Implications of Land Use Change in the Philippine Uplands

Despite reported economic growth for the Philippines in the last decades, increasing poverty has become a major concern with a high relative proportion of the poor belonging to the agriculture sector. Corn is the second major agricultural crop in the Philippines, which has posted increasing production trends in the last 12 years.

Ecojesuit: Global Jesuit collaboration and action on environment as relationship

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Jesuit responses to a rapidly changing world, environmental concerns, poverty, and violence are challenging its worldwide ministries.  There clearly is a need to initiate new processes for broader engagement by Jesuits in the larger transformation that Pope Francis seeks in caring for creation in Laudato Si’.  As the message of GC 36 and the conversations with the Holy Father spread, reflection is quietly deepening and this is where Ecojesuit wishes to strategically respond.

Powering the next generations

Miller Center for Social Entrepreneurship is committed to fighting global poverty to create a more just world. The center works towards this mission by supporting social enterprises around the world, through programs like the Global Social Benefit Fellowship. The Fellowship selects Santa Clara University students to work in a nine-month action research project for social enterprises in Miller Center’s network. In 2016 there were eighteen fellows working on eight projects around the world.

Zero hunger, food security, improved nutrition, and sustainable agriculture (SDG 2)

2017_01_15_Editorial_Photo1It is disconcerting that in the 21st century, hunger remains a second priority when talking about Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) – after eradication of extreme poverty, one of the main causes of hunger. The hunger problem, it would seem, should have been almost overcome, or is experienced only in pockets in certain areas of the world today.