Archive for 4. Lifestyle Initiative using SDGs from Local to Global

More Xaverian bike

Thanks to the roads built for safe transit cycling in the commune 22, which are connected with the entire city, mobilizing Xaverian cycling has grown significantly. At the moment we have 145 parking spaces for bicycles and is planned to continue building more parking places, thanks to the growing number of Xaverian who choose to use these non-motorized vehicles.

Besides being very convenient for mobility, the use of bicycles is a way to protect the environment, this being a sustainable maintenance alternative that avoids generating more pollution to the city. Moreover, the bike is also a way to train and exercise, becoming a great way to improve our health.

Zero hunger, food security, improved nutrition, and sustainable agriculture (SDG 2)

2017_01_15_Editorial_Photo1It is disconcerting that in the 21st century, hunger remains a second priority when talking about Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) – after eradication of extreme poverty, one of the main causes of hunger.

The hunger problem, it would seem, should have been almost overcome, or is experienced only in pockets in certain areas of the world today.  According to the UN World Food Programme however, “some 795 million people in the world do not have enough food to lead a healthy active life.  That’s about one in nine people on earth”, even as notable advancements are achieved in food issues.

CERED: Contributing to research for sustainable development in DR Congo

2016_09_30_pp_photo1CERED is part of the Institut Supérieur Agro-Vétérinaire Saint Pierre Canisius (ISAV) and now called Faculté des sciences Agronomiques et vétérinaires (FSAV), a Jesuit institution dedicated to research in agriculture, veterinary, and sustainable development, where sustainability involves anthropological, social and economic factors.  The program is multidisciplinary and participatory, involving diverse stakeholders that include researchers, students, research technicians, as well as local communities.  Research in CERED covers both theoretical and practical aspects and topics of natural sciences and the social sciences, and puts the welfare of people at the core of the research concerns.

Two great tasks of our time

loyola-meet-01-758x426How can Jesuits and their colleagues respond more effectively to the challenges of justice issues all over the world? That was the question explored by an international group of over fifty Jesuits and co-workers from various Jesuit justice organisations  when they met together in Loyola, Spain from 17-20 November. Among them was Irish Jesuit Martin Curry SJ, Programmes Officer of Irish Jesuit Missions.  As well as discussing the demands that social and environmental crises around the world make on those involved in areas of justice the group also explored how they could best cooperate and network together as part of an international organisation.

Jesuit universities boost green initiatives

2015.09.addu_solar_panelsJesuit schools in Asia Pacific are committed to growing green campuses in response to the Society’s growing ecological concern.  As a group, the members of the Association of Jesuit Colleges and Universities in Asia Pacific (AJCU-AP) recognise the need to develop ways to reduce consumption of waste material and to find a means to recycle them. They deem it essential to lessen the consumption of energy, paper and water, and instead make use of clean energy to minimise the emission of greenhouse gases. They have also considered how architecture can be helpful to cut energy needs and save on water costs.

Phil Jesuits focus on waste management

1435296086Major Jesuit houses in the Philippines have begun setting up waste management activities aiming to make the houses environmental friendly. At the Loyola House of Studies (LHS), steel cages have been installed at the back of the kitchen to facilitate proper segregation of waste.

With the help and support of kitchen employees and scholastics, plastic and glass bottles, tin cans and cardboard boxes are now collected for recycling, and kitchen waste is now properly dumped into a compost pit. The waste management activities at LHS started at the end of December with the support of the Father Superior and other priests in the community, the scholastics and staff.