Archive for Climate Change

Collaboration for Sustainability on Jesuit Campuses

9287609827_31e783887f_zFrom March 17-19, 2016, Loyola University Chicago hosted its third annual Climate Change Conference, entitled “Global Climate Change: Economic Challenges and Solutions.” This gathering focused on new economics, policies and activism taking place around the world to address climate change. Key highlights included the student sustainability summit, where students were invited to share from their own perspective about the sustainability initiatives occurring on their campuses and learn what’s working at other schools, as well as the keynote speech by award-winning author and climate activist, Naomi Klein.

Global Climate Change: Economic Challenges and Solutions March 17–19, 2016

CCC3This year’s conference “Global Climate Change: Economic Challenges and Solutions” will delve into international policy, new economics, and the climate justice and grassroots activism occurring worldwide due to climate change.

Putting justice into action in our schools

jm_climate_resourcesRiding on a wave of some amazing achievements last year, Jesuit Missions is looking forward to another full year of producing thought-provoking resources for schools.

Beginning this Lent (which starts on 10 February 2016), Jesuit Missions has prepared Our Common Home – a set of four weekly PowerPoints, designed for school assemblies. It follows a similar format to last year’s Great Hope but with an even stronger emphasis on the environment.

The Paris Agreement: Successes, disappointments, and the road ahead

2015_12_15_Editorial_Photo1In his opening remarks  to the media during the closing day of the COP21 climate talks  in Le Bourget, France on 11 December 2015, UN Secretary General Ban Ki-moon shared, “I have been attending many difficult multilateral negotiations, but by any standard, this negotiation is most complicated, most difficult, but most important for humanity.”

This statement reflects the weight of expectations placed on COP21. For many, the Paris Agreement was a success, reflecting a universal, explicit acknowledgement among the nations of the world, that climate change is a serious issue requiring urgent action. However, while long on ambition, the Agreement falls short on steps for concrete action.